Ciro Santilli
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Ciro Santilli publishes videos of this not-so-common visual programming experiments on his YouTube channel occasionally: https://www.youtube.com/c/CiroSantilli. Ciro should however not be lazy and also upload each video produced to wikimedia Commons, since YouTube does not offer a download option even for videos marked with a Creative Commons license: https://www.quora.com/Can-I-download-Creative-Commons-licensed-YouTube-videos-to-edit-them-and-use-them/answer/Tarmo-Toikkanen!
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This is also where Ciro's downtime converged to in his early 30's, since he long lost patience for stupid video games and television series.
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Ciro developed one interesting technique: while scrolling through YouTube's useless recommendations, when he understands what a channel is about, he either immediately:
  • subscribes if it is amazing and then "Don't recommend channel"
  • otherwise just "Don't recommend channel" immediately
This helps to keep this feed clean of boring stuff he already knows about. There is unfortunately an infinite amount of useless videos out there however on the topics of:
  • sports
  • music, mostly idiotic top of the charts
  • news and political commentary
  • food
  • programming tutorials. Meh, got Stack Overflow.
  • stuff that is not in English, and notably languages that Ciro does not even speak!
  • motorcycles
  • ASMR
  • cute animals
  • gaming and movie commentary. Ciro is interested only in a very specific number of video games
  • nature life, e.g. hiking, cycling, or living in isolation, this Ciro enjoys
  • science for kids (popular science)
and no matter how much you say you don't want to hear about them, YouTube juts keeps on sending more.
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Things Ciro hates about YouTube:
  • you can't follow or ignore a subject, only indirectly tell the algorithm about that. Once you click a popular cat video, you will be forced to watch cat videos for all eternity.
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Bought by Google in 2006.
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Video 174. r | p 2006: YouTube: From Concept to Hypergrowth - Jawed Karim by acmuiuc (2006) Source. Explains that the key enabling technology for YouTube was the addition of video capabilities to Macromedia Flash 7.
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Ancestors

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